DIGC202

Love’s Not A Competition, but Android’s Winning

Before I begin, I should let you all know i’m an Androidest amongst a circle of family and friends with predominantly Apple tendencies. So I may be a little bit bias here.1windows_xp_bliss-1280x720

Humans and devices alike, have a tendency to divide and segregate two battling sides. One’s against Zero’s, Edward diehards against Jacob diehards, and Androider’s against the Fruit Loops Apple’s. Present any two opposing forces, and they will collide in a Hunger Game-esque fashion until one is the victor, or a new player is introduced.

In the Game of Mobile Thrones, House Apple and House Android are competing for the throne in the global mobile market. But the head that wears the crown of reigning OS is heavy, and easily toppled. One day, Apple will reign supreme, the next Android will rear it’s fierce domination, the next Apple introduces an iPencil.

Roth detailed, Android’s solution to the emerging War of the Phones, was for the entirely free, open source mobile platform that anyone and everyone can become an operator- not just a user (Roth, 2008). Zittrain, on the other hand, reminded us that Apple is, and always will be locked away from its users, and they will ‘define everything that is on the phone’ (Zittrain, 2010).

Apple offers comfort and security above all else. Everything inside is shiny and pretty, all uniform and equal. Android offers us freedom and and generative control above all, open to all and impervious to uniformity. Apple is the pearl locked inside the oyster shell, and Android the ambiguous seed you are given to grow whatever tree you want, or leave it as a little sapling of their design. (Roth, 2008). Android has a hand in 85% of the mobile cookie jar, that united an empire but divided its ranks.

devide fragmentation

(http://opensignal.com/reports/2014/android-fragmentation/)

More than pitting two philosophies together, and greater than our love to choose our own destinies, we always return to comfort. A house divided against itself cannot stand, or keep its users 100% united and up to date . IOS version 9 took only 3 days to reach 1/5 users, Android Lollipop took 311 days because if its fragmentation (Spence 2015).

So yes, my fav is problematic, and living in a walled garden is a pretty peaceful and mindless life, but Android will still own my mobile-heart. Even though I am a sapling, and have barely scratched the surface of what Android and the Open Handset Alliance can offer, freedom to customise and create runs paramount to a one-way street of creation.

References:

Roth, D. (2008) ‘Google’s Open Source Android OS Will Free the Wireless Web’. Wired

Zittrain, J. (2010) ‘A fight over freedom at Apple’s core’. Financial Times

Spence, E (2015) iOS Crushes Android, Apple Update Over One Hundred Times Faster, Forbes

Images:
https://veryisabel.files.wordpress.com/2015/09/6c7bb-apple-logo-png-transparent-background.png

https://storybookstorage.s3.amazonaws.com/items/images/000/009/781/original/AristocratCrown_Transparent_brightgold.png?1416928158

http://www.masonbruce.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/android-logo-transparent-background.png

http://assets.nydailynews.com/polopoly_fs/1.1754431!/img/httpImage/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_1200/microsoft-xp.jpg

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6 thoughts on “Love’s Not A Competition, but Android’s Winning

  1. Interesting post, maybe a bit long but in all – good. However, I felt the lack of personality in your writing showed, quoting the readings at any chance you got. If I could lend you one piece of advice it’d be to just let loose on Apple. It’s bollocks that Apple doesn’t allow their users the same level of customisation as us. Android, generally using JavaScript is a fairly complex code, however if learnt has unlimited possibilities. I could tell me phone to send a message to Malcolm Turnbull with the words “you’re a piece of shit” written on it, if I was competent enough. Do you think having the ability to optimise our most personal device to no end entails exciting prospects?

    1. I don’t think I understand? The post oozed personality, and occasionally brought in well chosen references to the weekly readings which supported the content and gave it critical value…

  2. Hi,

    I have to disagree with the person above, as I felt as if your post had a lot of personality. It was very personable and opinionated which is always means for discussion.
    I am honestly personally not a passionate android-er nor, obsessed with Apple. I have technologies from both giants and I can see the positives and the negatives from either. The reason for it is because I honestly haven’t been able to part with the original Microsoft office. Yes, I must sound like a cave person, but I am just so used to it, I don’t feel like I need to know how to use anything other. Though, having done some work experience in different agencies and organisations, I have found that I fall behind as I am not across the shortcuts.

    I think perhaps it is a good idea to ensure a solid understanding of both the systems because you just never know when you will need to use them!

  3. hey,
    i enjoyed all the metaphors and Game of Thrones references, it made for an engaging post. I also liked how you stated your bias up front. I think its good that people have an option of having the freedom if they want or being able to play it safe with the comfort and security of apple.

  4. This was a wonderful fun little read! FULL of personality (love, love, loved all of your references and analogies) and well supported with quotes and theoretical concepts from the readings which makes the presentation of your opinions even more balanced and credible.

    As a fellow biased Android user I wonder whether uniformity is necessarily all that important to success in the long run. I know in my personal experience mass updates across devices have weirdly been more of a pain than an aid, but apart from that I feel like many Android users and potential Android users will think it’s worthwhile waiting longer for updates for the sake of more customisability. I mean, it’s always going to take longer to institute changes on something that can change itself and its own structures to massive degrees.

    Having said that, it is TOTALLY frustrating when you find out that these new things everyone is talking about (and that in some cases are altering language use in a big way) are iOS exclusive (I’m lookin’ at you Snapchat rainbow vomits and emojis!!). While I think there’s a good chance that Android tapping into the long tail effect will give it an edge in the market in the long run, we really will just have to wait and see.

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